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background. particularly, your cia background. >> i worked at cia and the national intelligence council in washington for 35 years. >> in what capacity? >> ultimately, became the national intelligence officer for latin america, which is a three or four star military equivalent. i was a civilian, of course, but it's a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba on the analytic side of intelligence. >> what does that mean? >> well, i was notysç a field operative. i did not -- i did not go out and conduct espionage. i did not meet foreign agents. i was basically, most of the career at headquarters, in virginia, i wrote national intelligence estimates, quite a few on cuba over the years, and on many of the other latin american countries. >> before we get into fidel castro and his regime, how did you get interested in that work? >> i was a student at georgetown university where i later taught for 25 years as an adjunct. teaches here now at the university of miami, but i was attracted to the foreign service school at georgetown. it was a time when a lot of us
, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at the immigration issue and thinking that they have been negotiation skills to resolve one of the most complicated and convoluted and far-reaching issues that i've seen in this congress. i do think there is a simple s
the fbi and cia, some of those gems had even showed up in gem shops in arizona. so he was selling these gems to finance his whole, you know, this whole campaign. and, again, going back to that this is a remote valley, captain kyle walton and others on the team knew tactically that this plan was flawed. but even though they knew that it was flawed, knew that there was incredible danger landing the helicopter at the bottom of the valley and that they would have to climb to the top of the valley to get to this compound where they knew the bad guy was surrounded by some of the best mercenaries, so to speak, in the world, these really trained mercenaries who had been fighting the soviets and, for, you know, for that ten years during the 1980s, they still went, and they still went to carry out this mission. and i think, kevin, you can describe a little bit about what happened once they landed. >> okay. so they take off from a base on the border, jalalabad, and they fly into this valley. and there's some concern at this point about the plane. there's a certain window that they had that t
crumpton is a legend. and after 24 years in the cia clandestine services, he became a little more public by helping then-secretary of state condoleezza rice coordinate the counterterrorism efforts around the world. he went even more public this past year with a book, a very well-received and well-reviewed book on "the art of intelligence." and behind those emerging from the world of shadows was a driving desire and ambition to educate american policymakers and especially the american public about the needs and uses of intelligence in our hyperconnected world of asymmetrical threats. but before that he created his signal legend in afghanistan where he took roughly 110 cia officers and 400-plus special operations forces to overthrow the taliban. mission accomplished, really, in a few very long weeks. so we'd like to start there, mr. ambassador, and say how did you get that mission, and how did you come up with that plan? >> shelby, thanks for the opportunity to be here. it was an intelligence mission first and foremost. if we look at afghanistan, and we deployed the first teams into afghan
munter is very familiar with the debate that went on between the state department and the cia. if you look at the drone strikes over the past four years, in 2010 there were 122 drone strikes. the numbers have been dropping since then has the highest number of drone strikes we have engaged in. as everybody in this audience i'm sure knows president obama has launched six times more drone strikes than george w. bush in his two terms in office. the numbers have dropped 40%, 25% from 2012. i think this is a very good thing. mainly because we have -- kayani, general kayani said if you keep going after the top 20 why have you done 300 drone strikes? it does not add up. i think that is a good point and if you look at the victims of the strikes, there is a debate about how many are civilians and we at the america foundation think the civilian casualty rate is very low in the single digits but certainly there is a civilian casualty problem. in pakistan we enjoy a 9% favorability rating down from 20% and the drones are part of that story. if the cost of the successful drum program is 80 million
analysts from the cia and state department look at what's happening in syria. and then remarks from the libyan ambassador to the u.s. >>> several live events to tell you about today on our companion network, c-span. including a speech by general ray odierno at the center for strategic and international studies to discuss the future of the army. that's at 10:30 a.m. eastern. our campaign coverage continues at 2:15 p.m. eastern with a rally for mitt romney in virginia just north of richmond. and also on c-span president obama's campaign rally at the university of colorado in boulder. that's live at 9 p.m. eastern. [cheers and applause] >> okay. let's get the album by grace coolidge that documents the coolidge family during their white house years and before. part of the coolidge family papers. we have one box that's just photographs and then several boxes of other documents. photographs are heavy. and the album should be in the back of the box here. here it is. unfortunately, it's on black acidic paper. that's not much we can do about that because we don't want to change the artifact
in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do you mean? >> what i mean, and this goes back, it's really a continuation of the same thing. i mean, first of all, in addition to demonstrating the network news divisions could make money, there was a technological explosion. wasn't just the three networks anymore. now you had cable. you have satellite television, the internet. so now there are quite literally hundreds, even thousands of competitors out there. what is incredibly cheap to put on the air is a couple of people like you and me just going at each other, right? talking. what draws an audience is when, in fact, we disagree. when, in fact, we get nasty with
of information he had as cia director about the threat before the attack and also why the information coming back to washington about the attack is so confusing. they don't understand what strength he was getting real-time on why they made a mistake in the week they initially characterized the attack. >> what to think of you looking for the coming weeks as the investigation goes forward? >> that they were interested and is the partisan rancor dies down the dig into deeper issues involved because i think there's a lot of politics at play here. but there's questions about how the state department is forward in securing people that wants to keep diplomats on the ground, for example, countries. the defense posture and north africa knows that is the changing security environment there. we want a bigger defense posture? it will be interesting to see if they didn't delve into some of those issues. >> you can read emily's work at rollcall.com and twitter. emily cadei, we appreciate you here joining us this afternoon. >> pleasure to be with you. >> at the last nearly half-century, the discussion of the as
." in a report requested by the c.i.a., the national research council wrote this year that -- quote -- "while climate change alone does not cause conflict, it may act as an accelerant of instability or conflict." and back to 2006, the center for naval analysis, a federally funded research and development center that's advised the navy and marine corps since 1942, convened a military advisory board of retired three star and four-star admirals and asked them to support on the threat of security on climate change. the report state that had quo question while uncertainty exists regarding the future extent of predicted climate change, the trends are clear. the nature and pace of climate change is being observed today pose grave implications for our national security. and of course, as the presiding officer knows, in the five years since, the evidence has tracked the worst of those climate change projections, not the most gentle. our nation's top military strategists, nation's top researchers, national research council and national academy of sciences all have recommended that our national security
-awaqi was killed by the c.i.a. in a drone strike in yemen. yet, if it's being interpreted, as we have heard by some of my colleagues represented here, the feinstein amendment were interpreted the way they have interpreted it, if al-awaqi made it to america to commit these terrorist acts, he gets his miranda rights, he gets all his rights here, but yet if he is in yemen committing acts to try to kill americans and our allies, then we can use a drone attack to him, but if he makes it to america -- which, by the way, the terrorists want to make it to america. 9/11 is exhibit a of that. why we would want to be in a position to read them their miranda rights, tell them you have the right to remain silent, our priority there has to be protecting american lives. that's the distinction between the law of war and a law with a common criminal in this country. and by the way, there are protections under the law. it's the right of habeas corpus where you do have a right to challenge your detention before the federal court with appeals with counsel, and that is certainly a protection that we have respected in t
that opportunity, i have been able to spend most of my career and nonpartisan public service. at the cia, i was able to work on a case called the united states versus osama bin laden, the prosecution of board members of al qaeda for bombing our embassies in east africa. i became a prosecutor myself, helping to make our communities safer including here in the hudson valley. violent crime, drug dealing, domestic violence. now, i am blessed to be raising three little boys with my wife, just a few miles from the house where i grew up to where my mom still lives. i want to make sure that that next generation, for all of our families have the same opportunities to live the american dream that i had. that means focusing on the middle class, not on the tea party agenda. tonight and you are going to your congressmen gibson talk a lot about being moderate and looking for a bipartisan solutions. but when you look past the rhetoric to the record, you will see that he's never a moderate when it matters. >> moderator: thank you, sir. mr. gibson, you have two minutes. gibson: thank you and good evening ev
the cia director had had an affair and he didn't tell the president or the intel committees in congress, should he resign, should older have resigned speak was holder should have resigned a long time ago, never one. and once again it shows the incompetence, or, or the complete neglect and dereliction of duty in eric holder's administration. if you think about it, i don't know what his duty is to tell the president of the united states what he knows, but he has a constitutional and statutory duty to tell the intelligence community what he knows about issues like this. and he failed to get, and i think the key to this is going to be the chairwoman of the intelligence community in the senate, because she's not happy. and you know, i know the media has done a good job of ignoring everything, every question we've asked about eric holder, but i think when she starts asking questions, i think we're going to get to the bottom of what's happening over here. and i am actually expecting her and her lying on her to do her job, or oversight job in the senate, just like we will do here in the house.
investigated for alleged misconduct related to the scandals that force the resignation of cia director david petraeus. this is about two and a half hours. >> good morning everybody. general joseph dunford jr. united states to be the next commander of the international security assistance force. this morning's hearing was originally scheduled to also include consideration of the nomination of general john allen to be commander of the u.s. european command and supreme allied commander. general allen of course currently holds the positions for which general dunford is nominated. however earlier this week the department of defense requested that general allen's nomination be put on hold, pending a department of defense inspector general reviewed. we have agreed and hope that the review can be completed from play. general dunford brings to this nomination he distinguished military career with over 35 years of military service. is currently the assistant commandant of the marine corps and is commanded combat forces in iraq. general, we thank you for your many years of service and for your willingn
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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